WASI: “Bleed Pop” EP Review

Written By: Mandi Lauren Nowitz

Twitter: @3icecubes

You may not know who WASI is but you are about to find out about this extraordinarily talented and charitable band that has performed at Vans warped Tour, LBGTQ Pride Shows and was named one of She Wired’s “Top 10 Queer and Female Fronted Bands You Need to Know Right Now.” That is a huge accomplishment for founders Merilou “Cosmo” Salazar and Jessie Meehan, who came together in high school when they realized that they had a lot in common, mainly feeling like they did not belong along with troubling home lives. “Bleed Pop” was released in 2015 as an EP and consisted of five tracks that grabbed them immediate attention and fandom.

In an interview with hellogiggles.com, Jessie and Cosmo explained how they landed on such a unique moniker. “We changed our name from “We Are / She Is” to “WASI.” We Are / She Is meant to us, finding individuality within a bold community. Also, it was hard for people to remember We Are / She Is, or they’d forget the “/” which was becoming a pet peeve because “We Are She Is” makes less sense.” Think HIM, which is really His Infernal Majesty and you have WASI. As for their influences, Cosmo cites, The Clash, Tegan and Sara, Matt and Kim, The Ting Tings, and Kesha while Jessie rocks out to India Arie, Spice Girls, Boyz II Men, Blink 182, Katy Perry, Sky Ferreira, and Icona Pop.


Though there are just five songs on “Bleed Pop,” there is not a bad one in the bunch. My two favorites are “Adolescents,” which is almost a throwback to early eighties pop, almost reminiscent of Nena’s “99 Luftballoons” and “Gets Me Everytime,” which is displays their love for The Ting Tings but in a much a lighter way. I love how they can be both super electro-pop yet balladeer pop at the same time, which makes for a well-rounded and exciting album listening experience. WASI’s “Bleed Pop” is definitely setting the bar for what electric music can do and how it should sound; the androgyny of the voices makes it even more enjoyable because the lyrics could be about anyone and that is what music is supposed to be. It should be universal and appealing to all, no matter what genre you prefer and WASI definitely delivers.